Tuesday, April 28, 2015

NI Multisim: Hall Effect Sensor & Magnetic Flux

NI Multisim: Hall Effect Sensor & Magnetic Flux

Written by Larsha Johnson
4/28/2015



Build a magnetic switch using a Hall Effect sensor in Multisim. In its simplest form, the sensor operates as an analog transducer, directly returning a voltage. With a known magnetic field, its distance from the Hall plate can be determined. Using groups of sensors, the relative position of the magnet can be deduced.

Hall Effect Sensors convert magnetic flux to a voltage. The output voltage of the sensor depends on the magnetic flux density.

Use this device in conjunction with either the Magnetic Flux Source or the Magnetic Flux Generator. Refer to the Magnetic Flux Source and Magnetic Flux Generator sections for more information.

This topic refers to education-specific features of Multisim

Other components used to simulate the design include the magnetic flux source and magnetic flux generator. These are recommended for simulation studies.

Magnetic Flux Source

This device is used with a Hall Effect Sensor.

The Magnetic Flux Source uses the default B key to change the density and polarity of the magnetic flux impacting on a Hall Effect Sensor. You must specify the sphere of influence of the magnetic flux source by entering an integer value in the Magnetic Channel field in the Value tab of the component’s properties dialog box.

The Magnetic Channel field on the Hall Effect Sensor must have a matching integer value for that sensor to be influenced by the source. No two magnetic flux sources or generators should have the same integer value in the Magnetic Channel field. You can have as many Hall Effect Sensors as you wish to react to any given source/generator and as many different sources/generators as desired as long as each source/generator has a different integer value.

Magnetic Flux Generator

This device is used with a Hall Effect Sensor.

 To locate Hall Effect Sensors, click Search from the Select a Component dialog box, and enter *hall effect sensor* in the Function field.

The Magnetic Flux Generator produces a continuous varying magnetic field (sinusoidal with N and S peaks). You can define the flux density, rate of rotation (translating to frequency) and specify the sphere of influence of the generator by putting a unique integer value in the Magnetic Channel field in the Value tab of the source’s properties dialog box.

The Magnetic Channel field on the Hall Effect Sensor must have a matching integer value for that sensor to be influenced by the generator. No two magnetic flux generators or sources should have the same integer value in the Magnetic Channel field. You can have as many Hall Effect Sensors as you wish to react to any given source/generator and as many different sources/generators as desired as long as each source/generator has a different integer value


HP 50g - Step-by-Step Mode

Friday, April 3, 2015

Stroboscope - Motion of a wild cat

The stroboscopic effect is a visual phenomenon caused by aliasing that occurs when continuous motion is represented by a series of short or instantaneous samples. It occurs when the view of a moving object is represented by a series of short samples as distinct from a continuous view, and the moving object is in rotational or other cyclic motion at a rate close to the sampling rate. It also accounts for the "wagon-wheel effect", so-called because in video or film, spoked wheels on horse-drawn wagons sometimes appear to be turning backwards.
A strobe fountain, a stream of water droplets falling at regular intervals lit with a strobe light, is an example of the stroboscopic effect being applied to a cyclic motion that is not rotational. When viewed under normal light, this is a normal water fountain. When viewed under a strobe light with its frequency tuned to the rate at which the droplets fall, the droplets appear to be suspended in mid-air. Adjusting the strobe frequency can make the droplets seemingly move slowly up or down. 

HP 50g - Graphing Rose Petals - Polar Graphs

Graphing Rose Petals - HP50g

Written by: Larsha Johnson
4/3/2015

How to graph a rose petal on the HP50g. Rose curve equations have two forms: 
  1. r = a cos(nθ) and 
  2. r = a sin(nθ) 
where a ≠ 0 and n is a positive integer. Petals have length determined by a. If n is odd, the number of petals is n. However, if n is even, the number of petals is 2n.

The simplicity and symmetry of Rhodonea or rose curves have fascinated mathematicians since they were first named by the Italian mathematician Guido Grandi in the 1700s. We were fascinated by an interesting pattern created by counting the number of petals of these curves.



In mathematics, a rose or rhodonea curve is a sinusoid plotted in polar coordinates. This concept is studied in Precalculus or Calculus.

Students will understand the role of the values of a and n in the equation r = asin(nθ).
Students will be able to predict the number of petals and their length by examining the polar equation.
Student will understand the relationship between the equation of a rose curve and the equation of a sinusoidal function.

Vocabulary
amplitude
frequency
rose curve
sinusoidal function

Touch Switch Circuit - 2N3904

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Use your HP 50g to solve Double Integrals in Calculus 3. New videos every Sunday. Grab your graphing calculator and Subscribe. See you there.

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The HP 50g is a powerful calculator. Find out just what it can do every Sunday. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel. Bits4Bots


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